Energy grids for 11 different ship types were simulated

JOULES project presents solutions for ultra low emission shipping

The EU-funded JOULES project recently presented its final results at a conference in Hamburg. SSPA was a partner in the four-year project, which developed simulation and assessment tools that were used to develop ship designs for two future scenarios (2025 and 2050), with significant reductions of energy consumption and emissions of greenhouse gases and other air pollutants.

Although the shipping industry is making progress in reducing emissions, particularly for those that have been the subject of regulations, there are many challenges ahead as shipping will be expected to make a fair contribution to worldwide reductions of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The JOULES project has looked at these challenges from the perspective of the European Maritime Industry and developed tools to assess different pathways to reduced GHG emissions from 11 different ship application cases. JOULES considers that the simulation of the vessel’s energy grid in the early design stage and the use of environmental and economic assessment tools are key to developing viable whole system solutions. 

—“This project used an integrated assessment methodology, combining simulation results with a life cycle performance assessment (LCPA) tool. By screening both environmental and economic aspects of ship operations we found that innovative design concepts for various ship types, built by European shipyards, could comply with reduction targets set for the 2025 and 2050 scenarios", says Joanne Ellis, Researcher and Project Manager at SSPA.

SSPA’s contributions to the project included inputs to the life cycle performance assessment tool, particularly regarding alternative fuel solutions. 

More information on the JOULES project, including the final brochure, can be found at the project website www.joules-project.eu

Illustrations

The EU-funded JOULES project recently presented its final results.

Energy grids for 11 different ship types were simulated.

An integrated assessment methodology was used, combining results of energy grid simulations with a life cycle performance assessment (LCPA) tool.